About Today

November 9

Dedication of the Lateran Basilica

Feast

The Lateran Basilica is the Cathedral of Rome, mother of all the churches. The Lateran Palace had been the home of a powerful Roman family, but became part of the dowry of Fausta, the second wife of Constantine. Constantine donated it to the Bishop of Rome, probably about 312. The basilica was dedicated in 324. The Lateran was the official residence of the Popes from the 4th century until their departure to Avignon in 1309. The church and palace declined during the 14th c., when there were two serious fires. The basilica was rebuilt. It is dedicated to Christ the Savior, John the Baptist and John the Evangelist. It is one of the four ‘Major Basilicas,’ and honoring this church is an expression of love, for it “presides in charity” over the community of the faithful. [1][2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Benedict XVI, Angelus, November 9, 2008.
[2] F.L. Cross and E.A. Livingstone, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (London: Oxford University Press, 1974), 801.
[3] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
Source: Divineoffice.org

About Today

November 2

The Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed (All Souls Day)

Feast

“But we would not have you ignorant, brethren, concerning those who are asleep, that you may not grieve as others do who have no hope. For since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, through Jesus, God will bring with him those who have fallen asleep,” (1 Thess 4:13-14). [1]

From ancient times, Christians have had the tradition of praying for the dead. Today, we lift up our hearts and prayers to those who have gone before us. In the Mystical Body of Christ, we are united with them and pray for their eternal souls. As well as our dearly departed, we are encouraged to pray for others, perhaps especially those who died as victims of injustice, war and hunger. In praying for the dead, we are reminded of the joys of eternal life, which through Christ Jesus, is made accessible to all of us.[2][3][4][5]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “Thessalonians, The First Letter of Paul to the.”
[2] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “Maccabees, The Second Book of the.”
[3] Benedict XVI, Angelus, November 2, 2008.
[4] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
[5] John Paul II, Angelus, November 2, 1997.
Source: Divineoffice.org

About Today

November 1

All Saints Day

Solemnity

“See what love the Father has given us, that we should be called children of God; and so we are,” (1 John 3:1). [1][2]

Today is the Solemnity of All Saints, a holy day of obligation. The Church honors all those who are with God, the innumerable men and women who chose fidelity to Christ. As Pope Benedict XVI ushers in The Year of Faith, “…a call to an authentic and renewed conversion to the Lord…,” we are encouraged to include a reflection on the New Evangelization. We can look to the saints as an example of evangelical zeal and Christian witness. According to a recent article published by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, ten saints who were particularly great evangelizers include; Sts Peter and Paul, St. Jerome, St. Augustine, St. Patrick, St. Francis of Assisi, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. Francis Xavier, St. Juan Diego, St. Daniel Comboni, and St. Therese of the Child Jesus.[3][4]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “John, The First Letter of.”
[2] Benedict XVI, Homily, November 1, 2006.
[3] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
[4] Jeannine Marino, For All Saints Day and The Year of Faith: ‘Ten Saints Who Were Great Evangelizers,’ October 22, 2012.
Source: Divineoffice.org

About Today

October 28

Saint Simon and Saint Jude, Apostles

Feast

“Judas, not the Iscariot, said to him, ‘Master, [then] what happened that you will reveal yourself to us and not to the world?’ Jesus answered and said to him, ‘Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him’” (John 14:22-23).[1]

Saints Simon and Jude were two of the Apostles. In the Gospel of Luke, Simon is called “the Zealot,” meaning he may have belonged to a radical anti-Roman group. Jude, the son of James, spoke with Jesus at the Last Supper. According to Passion of Simon and Jude, an apocryphal text, the two saints preached and were martyred together in Persia. These Apostles remind us to execute the will of God with a sense of inquiry and passion.[2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Scripture texts in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C. and are used by permission of the copyright owner. All Rights Reserved. No part of the New American Bible may be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from the copyright owner.
[2] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
[3] F.L. Cross and E.A. Livingstone, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (London: Oxford University Press, 1974), 764, 1276.
Source: Divineoffice.org

About Today

October 18

Saint Luke the Evangelist

Feast

“And he said to all, ‘If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it; and whoever loses his life for my sake, he will save it.” [1]

Today is the feast of St. Luke the Evangelist. Tradition assigns the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles to the Luke who was a companion of St. Paul. He wrote in fluent Greek and was well-versed in the Hebrew Scriptures. He was a skilled story-teller who gives us the parables of Lazarus and the Rich Man, the Good Samaritan, and the Father and His Two Sons. He highlights God’s plan of Salvation in history, Jesus’ call to conversion and faith, and the evangelizing mission of the Church. As Blessed John Paul II remarked, “As a minister of God’s Word, Luke leads us to knowledge of the discreet yet penetrating light that radiates from it, while illustrating the reality and events of history.”[2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “Luke, The Gospel According To.”
[2] John Paul II, Message to the Archbishop of Padua, October 15, 2000.
[3] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
Source: Divineoffice.org