About Today

November 1

All Saints Day

Solemnity

“See what love the Father has given us, that we should be called children of God; and so we are,” (1 John 3:1). [1][2]

Today is the Solemnity of All Saints, a holy day of obligation. The Church honors all those who are with God, the innumerable men and women who chose fidelity to Christ. As Pope Benedict XVI ushers in The Year of Faith, “…a call to an authentic and renewed conversion to the Lord…,” we are encouraged to include a reflection on the New Evangelization. We can look to the saints as an example of evangelical zeal and Christian witness. According to a recent article published by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, ten saints who were particularly great evangelizers include; Sts Peter and Paul, St. Jerome, St. Augustine, St. Patrick, St. Francis of Assisi, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. Francis Xavier, St. Juan Diego, St. Daniel Comboni, and St. Therese of the Child Jesus.[3][4]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “John, The First Letter of.”
[2] Benedict XVI, Homily, November 1, 2006.
[3] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
[4] Jeannine Marino, For All Saints Day and The Year of Faith: ‘Ten Saints Who Were Great Evangelizers,’ October 22, 2012.
Source: Divineoffice.org

About Today

October 28

Saint Simon and Saint Jude, Apostles

Feast

“Judas, not the Iscariot, said to him, ‘Master, [then] what happened that you will reveal yourself to us and not to the world?’ Jesus answered and said to him, ‘Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him’” (John 14:22-23).[1]

Saints Simon and Jude were two of the Apostles. In the Gospel of Luke, Simon is called “the Zealot,” meaning he may have belonged to a radical anti-Roman group. Jude, the son of James, spoke with Jesus at the Last Supper. According to Passion of Simon and Jude, an apocryphal text, the two saints preached and were martyred together in Persia. These Apostles remind us to execute the will of God with a sense of inquiry and passion.[2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Scripture texts in this work are taken from the New American Bible, revised edition © 2010, 1991, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C. and are used by permission of the copyright owner. All Rights Reserved. No part of the New American Bible may be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from the copyright owner.
[2] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
[3] F.L. Cross and E.A. Livingstone, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (London: Oxford University Press, 1974), 764, 1276.
Source: Divineoffice.org

About Today

October 18

Saint Luke the Evangelist

Feast

“And he said to all, ‘If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it; and whoever loses his life for my sake, he will save it.” [1]

Today is the feast of St. Luke the Evangelist. Tradition assigns the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles to the Luke who was a companion of St. Paul. He wrote in fluent Greek and was well-versed in the Hebrew Scriptures. He was a skilled story-teller who gives us the parables of Lazarus and the Rich Man, the Good Samaritan, and the Father and His Two Sons. He highlights God’s plan of Salvation in history, Jesus’ call to conversion and faith, and the evangelizing mission of the Church. As Blessed John Paul II remarked, “As a minister of God’s Word, Luke leads us to knowledge of the discreet yet penetrating light that radiates from it, while illustrating the reality and events of history.”[2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “Luke, The Gospel According To.”
[2] John Paul II, Message to the Archbishop of Padua, October 15, 2000.
[3] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
Source: Divineoffice.org

About Today

September 29

Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael, Archangels

Feast

“Because you have made the Lord your refuge, the Most High your habitation, no evil shall befall you, no scourge come near your tent. For he will give his angels charge of you to guard you in all your ways. On their hands they will bear you up, lest you dash your foot against a stone.” [1]

Today is the feast day of Sts Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael, Archangels. They are mentioned by name in Sacred Scripture in the books of Tobit, Daniel, Luke, 1 Thessalonians, Jude, and Revelation. The Catechism of the Catholic Church tells us, “…the whole life of the Church benefits from the mysterious and powerful help of angels.” John Paul II, in a General Audience, reminds us that the name of each Archangel reflects a facet of the nature of God. St. Michael’s name means ‘Who is like God?,’ St. Gabriel’s ‘power of God,’ and St. Raphael’s ‘God heals.’ To angels, God has entrusted a special mission with human beings at the center. [2][3][4]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “The Psalms.”
[2] Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2nd ed., 328-336.
[3] Benedict XVI, Homily, September 29, 2007.
[4] John Paul II, Angels Participate in the History of Salvation, August 6, 1986.
Source: Divineoffice.org

About Today

September 14

The Exaltation of the Holy Cross

Feast

“Have this mind among yourselves, which was in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form he humbled himself and became obedient unto death, even death on a cross,” (Phil.2:5-8). [1]

Today we honor the Exaltation of the Holy Cross and Jesus’ triumph upon it. In today’s feast, we are reminded of God’s plan of Salvation and His work to raise up humankind through the saving power of Jesus Christ. In Christ on the Cross, sin is overcome and we are offered a new life, with Christ at the center. According to a traditional account, the relics of the holy cross were discovered by St. Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, in 326 when she was on a pilgrimage in Jerusalem. The relics were captured by Persians but later returned in 628 and now reside at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. [2][3][4]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1]Revised Standard Version s.v., “Philippians, The Letter of Saint Paul to the.”
[2] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “Archeology of the Cross and Crucifix.”
[3] Benedict XVI, Homily, September 15, 2008.
[4] John Paul II, Homily, September 14, 1988.
Source: Divineoffice.org